PowerDNS service for get coordinates for IPv4 addresses

Bert Hubert from PowerDNS made an interesting announcement today. Retrieving the coordinates for an IPv4 address with just a DNS query.


Hopefully the country code will also be included, but this is an interesting way of using DNS as a directory service with public data.

Removing SPF Resource Records

With the creation of RFC 4408 also new a record type 99 for DNS was created to identify SPF Resource Records. It was advised to have both TXT and SPF records in DNS with the same content.  RFC 4408 was obsoleted by RFC 7208 in 2014 with paragraph 3.1 stating the following:

SPF records MUST be published as a DNS TXT (type 16) Resource Record (RR) [RFC1035] only.  The character content of the record is encoded as [US-ASCII].  Use of alternative DNS RR types was supported in SPF's experimental phase but has been discontinued.

Now that the SPF Resource Record has been discontinued for  a while, the time has come to remove it from DNS (if not done already) and make sure it never comes back. Luckily most code libaries already preferred the TXT variant, but still this is one to put on the maintenance checklist to remove it for any application code and/or infrastructure.

Emoji in URLs are probably a bad idea…

On the dns-operations mailing list there were already discussions about parties who bought domains like ♀.com (xn--e5h.com), but the following is also an interesting development.


When will we find pages with “special” Web Open Fonts and that become active when you press Ctrl-Shift?

Blocking the piratebay

In a previous post it became clear that censorship in The Netherlands has started. Due to the nature of the Internet and how it has been implemented in most lands, it means there is no central point of control to stop all to an IP-address. This means every network owner needs to take action, but how do they do it?

In the case of thepiratebay.org it looks like it has been done by manipulating DNS-answers. The first attempt is just using the DNS-resolver from the internet access provider and the second is an attempt using Google public resolvers.

$ dig thepiratebay.org
 
; < <>> DiG 9.8.1 < <>> thepiratebay.org
;; global options: +cmd
;; Got answer:
;; ->>HEADER< <- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 6811
;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 1
 
;; QUESTION SECTION:
;thepiratebay.org.		IN	A
 
;; ANSWER SECTION:
thepiratebay.org.	10	IN	A	194.109.6.92
 
;; ADDITIONAL SECTION:
thepiratebay.org.	10	IN	TXT	"Forged by XS4ALL for Stichting B.R.E.I.N."
 
;; Query time: 19 msec
;; SERVER: 192.168.178.1#53(192.168.178.1)
;; WHEN: Sat Feb  4 08:15:35 2012
;; MSG SIZE  rcvd: 104
 
$ dig thepiratebay.org @8.8.8.8
 
; <<>> DiG 9.8.1 < <>> thepiratebay.org @8.8.8.8
;; global options: +cmd
;; Got answer:
;; ->>HEADER< <- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 4847
;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 0
 
;; QUESTION SECTION:
;thepiratebay.org.		IN	A
 
;; ANSWER SECTION:
thepiratebay.org.	2596	IN	A	194.71.107.50
 
;; Query time: 26 msec
;; SERVER: 8.8.8.8#53(8.8.8.8)
;; WHEN: Sat Feb  4 08:16:16 2012
;; MSG SIZE  rcvd: 50

By just changing DNS resolvers on the client or internet router the censorship can be bypassed for now. The question remaining is how long this is going to stand when the first article is published by a big computer magazine on how to bypass it. Or when sites also get an .onion to bypass DNS completely.